Monday, February 10, 2014

NWACC is a Corporate Serial Bullying Culture

What is Corporate/Institutional Bullying?

Corporate/institutional bullying occurs when bullying is entrenched in an organization and becomes accepted as part of the workplace culture. Corporate/institutional bullying can manifest itself in different ways:
  • Placing unreasonable expectations on employees, where failure to meet those expectations means making life unpleasant (or dismissing) anyone who objects.
  • Dismissing employees suffering from stress as “weak” while completely ignoring or denying potential work-related causes of the stress. And/or
  • Encouraging employees to fabricate complaints about colleagues with promises of promotion or threats of discipline.
Signs of corporate and institutional bullying include:
  • Failure to meet organizational goals.
  • Increased frequencies of grievances, resignations, and requests for transfers.
  • Increased absence due to sickness. And
  • Increased disciplinary actions.
If you are aware of bullying in the workplace and do not take action, then you are accepting a share of the responsibility for any future abuses. This means that witnesses of bullying behavior should be encouraged to report any such incidences. Individuals are less likely to engage in antisocial behavior when it is understood that the organization does not tolerate such behavior and that the perpetrator is likely to be punished.

This serial bullying that is practiced at NWACC includes their students/clients/victims.

From: http://66.102.9.104 Washington State Department of Labor & Industries

http://bulliedacademics.blogspot.com/2008/09/what-is-corporateinstitutional-bullying.html

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Non-Anonymous/Anonymous Wronged NWACC Student Responds to NWACC News Article

Non-anonymous/Anonymous student’s responses are in brackets contained herein.

The Benton County Daily Record
Author: Unsigned Editorial – 1/28/2014

With Unsigned Claims, College Responds Well

“Anonymous pamphlets, leaflets, brochures and even books have played an important role in the progress of mankind. Persecuted groups and sects from time to time throughout history have been able to criticize the oppressive practices and laws either anonymously or not at all … It is plain that anonymity has sometimes been assumed for the most constructive purposes.” Hugo L. Black – Supreme Court Justice, 1937-1971 [Wise man]

“To me, constructive criticism is when people take ownership of their ideas. That’s why I don’t listen to anything that’s anonymous.” Brene Brown – Research professor and author [It is clear that Ms. Brown has had no experiences with NWACC. If she had, she would likely have a different perspective.]

The still new president of NorthWest Arkansas Community College responded as well as anyone could to claims of bullying contained in an email criticizing the atmosphere in the school’s nursing program. [I believe the new president of NWACC truly wants to resolve these issues, but she has very little to work with at this point in time. What is sad for her is that she has likely jumped into the tiger’s mouth without having been given the courtesy of being forewarned. If this is the case, this was a gross injustice done to her. It is my opinion that had she been forewarned, she would not have accepted her new position as president of NWACC.]

No heads rolled. No disciplinary action. No unpending of the program. [Don’t forget to mention that no formal grievances were filed either. This is when the bullying and harassment escalates to new heights.] Why not? [Because I chose to not be anonymous, and as soon as I filed my formal grievance, these NWACC bullies immediately retaliated and brought my up against disciplinary action and my grievance has never been heard to this day . I’ve lost everything – my good credit standing, my career in respiratory therapy, my house. I’ve been severely punished for having attempted to stand up for myself. After learning this lesson the hard way, I chose to be anonymous and was stalked, harassed, outed, and had a law suit slapped on me. So, you see, there is no justice with this bullying machine.] 

The claims were sensational. They were also anonymous. [Indeed they were sensational – and true – and anonymous for a very good reason. The NWA media has known about me and my identity for years, but thus far they have refused to tell my story even though I have the documentation and evidence to back it up. Again, anonymous or not, I have been unable to get my story out there, and my grievance heard so as to help prevent other wronged NWACC students/clients from having to go through the same brutality. My due process rights were grossly violated, per the United States Constitution, per the Arkansas Constitution of 1874, and per NWACC policy. NWACC broke almost every one of their own policies in the handling of my grievance that was immediately turned into disciplinary action and wrongful expulsion just three weeks prior to graduation and after attending NWACC for 3.5 years. Additionally, there were the two years of brutal bullying that I was forced to endure by respiratory therapy director, Alan Clark, respiratory therapy instructor, Michelle Frazier, and dean of health professions, Mary Ross. And I have interviewed countless wronged NWACC students whose stories are similar to mine.]

Anonymity at the least raises questions about veracity and credibility [I respectfully disagree. There is a fallacy to this argument that I have already elaborated upon.] People who do not openly stand by their criticisms do not deserve the same attention as those who will. [Again, I respectfully disagree. The NWA media has known about NWACC corruption/bullying for years - it’s been going on since they opened their doors in 1990 - but uses this discrediting of the anonymous argument as an excuse not to have to cover these stories. To discredit the anonymous who have obvious and real concerns because they are in fear for their safety and well-being is the same as turning one’s back on those who are in the most need of help. Those who choose to be anonymous are clearly oppressed individuals and they have very good reasons for wishing to remain anonymous. My suggestion for how to deal with the anonymous is to listen to their stories and study their evidence to see if their choice of remaining anonymous is legitimate or not. I believe it is a gross injustice to just dismiss anonymous individuals based on the fallacy of this argument.] 

This criticism came from “Concerned NWACC Nursing Class of 2014.” The email so signed claimed two instructors singled out students to “bully, harass and sabotage their efforts to learn.” [This is exactly what happened to me and to many other wronged NWACC students/clients/victims.] It also was critical of teaching techniques [Correct – they don’t teach much in the nursing program, nor in the respiratory therapy program. They read power point presentations to the class and use trickery methods in their testing practices. They also practice grades tampering.] The sender(s) alleged program instructors initially failed 63 percent of the class then changed grades to reflect a 20 percent failure rate. [I have the evidence to prove that grades tampering occurs at NWACC.]

A reporter for this newspaper made contact with the email account from which the note was sent, identifying its user as a woman who believed her letter speaks for “just about every student in the nursing program.” [Yes, it does. This student is absolutely correct about this.] “We are taking the allegations from these anonymous students very seriously,” President Evelyn Jorgenson said in a statement. “I am personally looking into the situation and reviewing all available information.” [Thank you, President Jorgenson. There are so many wronged NWACC students/clients/victims who appreciate your efforts to get to the bottom of this. I possess all the information that you need in order for you to understand the immense task you have ahead of you in resolving these issues. I’m here and I’m not anonymous, and I am the face and voice for these students. My story is their story. Their story is my story.]

Jorgenson is responding exactly as she should [Indeed, she is], by investigating what she can about the claims contained in a document that could be accurate [It is completely accurate], could be completely false [Let’s strike this option] or could result from misunderstandings [Let’s strike this option, too. These claims are completely accurate and there are no misunderstandings.] The assertions made deserve a serious examination solely by their nature. [Indeed they do. An in-depth investigation by a neutral third party of the entire institution would be highly recommended. I believe this undertaking requires that President Jorgenson be provided with help as this is an almost impossible task for her to have to undertake alone. She needs and deserves help.] 

It’s fathomable prior college administrators viewed the anonymity as the only factor, using it to dismiss the need for a more in-depth review. [They used this as an excuse to dismiss their students/clients/victims in order to cover up their rampant bullying and corruption.] The sender of this e-mail clearly feels retribution or, worse, inaction. [Actually, it’s the other way around. The retaliation after submitting a formal grievance is much more brutal than inaction.] Jorgenson seems to appreciate the value of dealing with such issues directly, and that can only serve to help diminish the anonymous fears and concerns. It will be instructive to learn what comes of the complaint. [I’m here to help you in any way I can, President Jorgenson, with whatever information you need. I, and my cohorts, have all the information you need to get to the bottom of this.]

Strangely, while the anonymous sender(s) claimed instructors were not teaching and students learned only through their own efforts, a local hospital who hires from the program reports having no issues with the nurses they’ve hired. [Very strange, indeed. This person is a CEO sitting in his ivory tower and has no clue what’s going on in his very own hospital. Most NWACC students I interviewed were informed that the local hospitals strongly dislike NWACC students. I, too, was told this. In fact, the UofA will no longer take NWACC nursing credits because they know that NWACC teaches very little to their students.]The college needs a robust program that is challenging academically. [Yes it does, which they don’t have. Rather, it’s all about trickery, grades tampering, bullying, favoratism, and harassment.] After all, nobody wants to have the D-minus student who barely passed working his floor at a hospital. [Correct, but what about the A student whose grades have been tampered with and altered to show a D-minus?] 

Nursing is a tough job, so a nursing program ought to be tough, but certainly not abusive. [NWACC’s nursing program is tough, but only in the sense that these students are put through a rigorous two years of bullying, harassment, grades tampering, favoritism, nasty politics, dividing and conquering the class, and the list goes on and on. It’s horrific what NWACC’s nursing program and respiratory therapy program puts their students/clients/victims through. It’s in total violation of the universal declaration of human rights.]

(And, yes, this editorial is unsigned. That’s not anonymity. The daily editorial reflects the stance of this newspaper as determined by an editorial board made up of Publisher Rusty Turner, local editors Mike Jones and Leeanna Walker and Opinion Page Editor Greg Harton.)

[Signed Non-Anonymous/Anonymous Wronged NWACC Allied Health Student/Client/Victim (it doesn’t much matter, anonymous or not, the end result is the same.)]



Tuesday, January 28, 2014

NWACC Responds to Nursing Students’ Claims

The Benton County Daily Record

Author: Unsigned Editorial

With Unsigned Claims, College Responds well

“Anonymous pamphlets, leaflets, brochures and even books have played an important role in the progress of mankind. Persecuted groups and sects from time to time throughout history have been able to criticize the oppressive practices and laws either anonymously or not at all … It is plain that anonymity has sometimes been assumed for the most constructive purposes.” Hugo L. Black – Supreme Court Justice, 1937-1971

“To me, constructive criticism is when people take ownership of their ideas. That’s why I don’t listen to anything that’s anonymous.” Brene Brown – Research professor and author

The still new president of NorthWest Arkansas Community College responded as well as anyone could to claims of bullying contained in an email criticizing the atmosphere in the school’s nursing program.

No heads rolled. No disciplinary action. No unpending of the program. Why not? The claims were sensational. They were also anonymous. Anonymity at t he least raises questions about veracity and credibility. 

People who do not openly stand by their criticisms do not deserve the same attention as those who will. This criticism came from “Concerned NWACC Nursing Class of 2014.” The email so signed claimed two instructors singled out students to “bully, harass and sabotage their efforts to learn.” It also was critical of teaching techniques. The sender(s) alleged program instructors initially failed 63 percent of the class then changed grades to reflect a 20 percent failure rate.

A reporter for this newspaper made contact with the email account from which the note was sent, identifying its user as a woman who believed her letter speaks for “just about every student in the nursing program.”

“We are taking the allegations from these anonymous students very seriously,” President Evelyn Jorgenson said in a statement. “I am personally looking into the situation and reviewing all available information.”

Jorgenson is responding exactly as she should, by investigating what she can about the claims contained in a document that could be accurate, could be completely false or could result from misunderstandings. The assertions made deserve a serious examination solely by their nature. It’s fathomable prior college administrators viewed the anonymity as the only factor, using it to dismiss the need for a more in-depth review. The sender of this e-mail clearly feels retribution or, worse, inaction. Jorgenson seems to appreciate the value of dealing with such issues directly, and that can only serve to help diminish the anonymous fears and concerns. It will be instructive to learn what comes of the complaint.

Strangely, while the anonymous sender(s) claimed instructors were not teaching and students learned only through their own efforts, a local hospital who hires from the program reports having no issues with the nurses they’ve hired. The college needs a robust program that is challenging academically. After all, nobody wants to have the D-minus student who barely passed working his floor at a hospital. Nursing is a tough job, so a nursing program ought to be tough, but certainly not abusive.

(And, yes, this editorial is unsigned. That’s not anonymity. The daily editorial reflects the stance of this newspaper as determined by an editorial board made up of Publisher Rusty Turner, local editors Mike Jones and Leeanna Walker and Opinion Page Editor Greg Harton.)

Saturday, January 25, 2014

NWACC Alternative - Crowder College, Jane, MO, Branch Offers RN Nursing Program

Missouri College Opens Classes Near Bella Vista

Crowder College Begins Center In Jane


By Amye Buckley (January 11, 2014)
ABUCKLEY@NWAONLINE.COM

JANE, Mo. A Missouri community college opened an outpost that could draw more Northwest Arkansas students.
The Crowder College McDonald County Center, at 194 College Road in Jane, Mo., is about 2 miles from the Arkansas border and about 8 miles from NorthWest Arkansas Community College’s Bentonville campus.

Nursing student Stephanie Wheeler of Bentonville said she was drawn to the two-year registered nursing program because of its reputation. It’s a family here, Wheeler said. Instructors are invested in each one of us. It’s very obvious.

Classes for the McDonald County nursing program started in a rented building in Pineville. That was a 25-minute drive and the new campus will be only about a 15-minute commute, Wheeler said. The dozen classrooms and labs at the Jane campus will host classes in nursing, accounting, agriculture, business, criminal justice, English, Spanish, math, science and history.

Leadership at the Missouri college say they are not trying to lure Arkansas students to the school, but it will attract them because of its proximity to the state line. We’ve felt for a long time that some parts of our district, and, frankly, parts of Northwest Arkansas are under served, said Kent Farnsworth, interim president of Crowder College.

The commute from Noel, Mo., to Neosho, Mo., isn’t always practical, so Crowder officials want to put the centers where the people are, Farnsworth said. Because the building is at the southern point of the community college’s reach, it will serve not only Jane and Noel, but Bella Vista and Rogers, he said. Some students might find Crowder more local or more affordable, said Andy Wood, Crowder board president.

Were not in competition, but at the same time we’re not going to turn anyone away, Wood said. There were 258 Arkansas students among the 5,845 students enrolled at Crowder College this fall. There were 64 Missouri students enrolled at NorthWest Arkansas Community College.

The building will be named James B. Tatum Hall later this month for Jim Tatum, a founding college board member. Creating a McDonald County center has long been a goal for Tatum, who will retire from the Crowder board this month after 50 years of service.

The native stone and design of the building reflect its Ozark location, Tatum said. Community donations paid for part of the center’s construction. Local families and businesses paid for naming rights to nearly every room in the building. It’s a striking example of who we are and where we are, Tatum said.

Student access to education has two primary factors: geography and time, Tatum said. The highway system makes everything close, but students want to take classes when they want to take them, not necessarily when they’re scheduled, he said. More options will create more graduates, Farnsworth said.

In Arkansas, NorthWest Arkansas Community College is conducting focus groups this month on an expansion in Washington County that will give the college a second permanent home. Evelyn Jorgenson, president of NorthWest Arkansas Community College, said she doesn’t see Crowder College’s presence in Jane as a problem for her school. I believe it presents an opportunity for more students to receive education and training necessary for their success, Jorgenson said.

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

NWACC College Criticism Sparks Review

Publication: Benton County Daily Record;  Date: Jan 17, 2014; 
Section: News;  Page: 1

College Criticism Sparks Review

By Dave Perozek DPEROZEK@NWAONLINE.COM

BENTONVILLE - The president of NorthWest Arkansas Community College said this week she is investigating claims of bullying by instructors and other problems in the school's nursing program.

An email, signed only by a Concerned NWACC Nursing Class of 2014 states two instructors have singled out students to bully, harass and sabotage their efforts to learn. It also criticizes teaching techniques and alleges the program initially failed 63 percent of the class for the fall semester, then changed grades to reflect a 20 percent failure rate.

The email was sent last week to several college administrators, including Evelyn Jorgenson, president, and Steven Gates, senior vice president for learning and provost. We are taking the allegations from these anonymous students very seriously, Jorgenson said in a statement emailed from the college. I am personally looking into the situation and reviewing all available information.

Steven Hinds, college director of public relations and marketing, said the college does not know who wrote the email. There were 122 students enrolled in the program during the fall semester. No grievances or grade appeals were filed in the program last semester, he said. There are several ways students may file a grievance either in person or anonymously, Hinds said. They include contacting the human resources department or the department's dean. Students also may use the student grievance process or the Ethics Reporting Hotline, Hinds said.

NWA Media contacted the writer of the email, who declined to give her name. The woman said she believes her letter speaks for just about every student in the nursing program. No grievances were filed last semester because students have seen what happens to people who do that, she said. Either you become a bigger target or nothing changes, the woman said. She said she is in the process of filing a complaint at the state level.

The college received a similar email a year ago, also written anonymously, expressing concerns about the nursing program. However, we don't know the identity of the person or who to approach to get more information, he said. No one contacted my office or the president's office.

The most recent email states instructors are simply reading PowerPoint presentations to students and students are not being taught. Every single student in our class learns by studying on our own, the email states. We learn nothing from our instructors. There's no reason to believe instructors are not following proper teaching techniques, Hinds said.

The email also states the nursing program failed 63 percent of the class last semester and alleges the administration changed students' grades to reflect only a 20 percent failure rate.
We have screen shots of our grades changing by the minute after the final exam was taken, the email states.

That allegation is questionable because the college's grade system is not live time, so students can't watch faculty members enter grades, Hinds said. It is possible, however, for final grades to change during a particular day as assignment or test scores are entered.

The college's nursing program is respected among area hospitals, Jorgenson said. Hospital administrators who hire our nursing graduates continually offer positive feedback about how well prepared these individuals are, she said.

Washington Regional Medical Center often hires nurses who have gone through the college's program, said Steve Percival, the hospital's vice president of human resources. They've been clinically sound, Percival said. I'm not aware of any issues with them.

The email also points out the college's nursing program is not accredited. Nursing students are going through an invalid program!!!!, the email states. The program, which began in 1990, has the approval of the Arkansas State Board of Nursing, but is not nationally accredited, Hinds said. The college is going through that process now.

The first step toward national accreditation is to ensure all full-time faculty and at least half of the adjunct faculty have master's degrees. The college met that requirement in August. Completing the accreditation process likely will take another year, Hinds said.

All Arkansas nursing programs leading to licensure must be approved by the Board of Nursing in order for their graduates to be eligible for licensure as a nurse, said Sue Tedford, director of the Board of Nursing. Once a program has obtained full approval, it is resurveyed every five years. However, if issues arise in between visits, the Board of Nursing may review the program at that time, Tedford said.

Sunday, January 19, 2014

NWACC Alternative - Top 10 Best Online Nursing Degree Programs

http://www.besthealthdegrees.com/top/online-undergraduate-nursing-programs


There is the option of taking out Federal Stafford Student Loans to help students pay for their tuition: https://fafsa.ed.gov/

Registered nurses (RNs) make up the majority of workers in the health care field. Although over half of nurses work in hospitals, they can also work in doctors’ offices, nursing homes and for companies providing home health care services. Projected job growth to the year 2018 is excellent, and the schools on this list of the top 10 best online undergraduate nursing programs can give students the knowledge they need to qualify for challenging and rewarding positions in the field.

Featured Undergraduate Nursing Degree Programs

#1 Kent State University

Executive Summary
Kent State was named as the Best College in the Midwest by the Princeton Review. This school has a reputation for academic excellence in its on-campus and online programs.
Tuition
The tuition for the online Nursing program is $425 per credit hour.
Unique Features
As a top undergraduate nursing program, Kent State’s RN-to-BSN (Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing) degree program is designed to prepare nurses for leadership roles. Students benefit from a support network which includes an admissions counselor, student services manager, technical services personnel. Faculty members who teach courses were also responsible for developing the curriculum.

#2 Brenau University

Executive Summary
Brenau University was listed on U.S. News & World Report’s Honor Roll for top online programs for 2012. This school has also been recognized by the Princeton Review as one of the Best Southwestern Colleges.
Tuition
The tuition rate for Brenau’s online Nursing program is $526 per credit.
Unique Features
The RN-to-BSN program from Brenau can be completed in three semesters. Students must also complete a six-hour practicum to graduate.

#3 Saint Peter’s College

Executive Summary
Saint Peter’s College is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.
Tuition
The cost of attending this school is $29,800 per academic year.
Unique Features
Students enrolled in the RN-to-BSN program at St. Peter’s are exposed to a curriculum which is focused on caring for the whole person. They have the flexibility to do their coursework on their own schedule; assignments must be submitted by the due date chosen by the instructor.

#4 Western Governors University

Executive Summary
Western Governors is a nationally and regionally-accredited school. It is a non-profit institution which is a good fit for learners who are independent and highly disciplined.
Tuition
Students attending WGU online pay a flat rate of $3,250 per six-month term.
Unique Features
WGU offers a Bachelor’s degree in Nursing (Prelicensure) to students in Florida, Indiana, Texas, Southern California and Utah. This program is limited to local students, since there is a required clinical component which must be completed to graduate. The RN-to-BSN program is open to learners from any location, and can be completed in 18 months.

#5 Chamberlain College of Nursing

Executive Summary
Chamberlain College of Nursing has been training nurses for over 120 years. This school is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission.
Tuition
Students enrolled at Chamberlain College of Nursing pay $590 per credit hour for tuition.
Unique Features
The online BSN-to-RN program is taught by instructors who have real-life experience in the nursing field. The program can be completed in three semesters with no on-site clinical rotation required.

#6 Colorado Technical University

Executive Summary
Colorado Technical University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. This school is known for its supportive learning community and the personalized attention instructors and staff give to students.
Tuition
Tuition for CTU online undergraduate programs is $305 per credit hour.
Unique Features
Colorado Tech medical University offers an RN-to-BSN degree completion program, which can help to prepare students for graduate as well as advance practice programs. The curriculum is designed to help students develop critical thinking, analytical and clinical reasoning skills, which will prepare them for real-life situations they will face on the job.

#7 Grand Canyon University

Executive Summary
Grand Canyon University has been offering quality nursing programs for over 25 years. This Christian school is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and has held this status since 1968.
Tuition
This online Nursing degree program costs $687.50 per credit.
Unique Features
This school offers an RN-to-BSN program, as well as a number of Bridge-to-MSN degree programs for students who need to complete some prerequisite courses before starting graduate school. Students work on one course at a time so that they can develop an in-depth understanding of the material without juggling several classes at once.

#8 Florida Hospital College of Health Sciences

Executive Summary
Florida Hospital College of Health Sciences is a private Christian school which is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.
Tuition
This program costs $315 per credit hour.
Unique Features
Students can complete their RN-to-BSN degree in 18 months and take courses one at a time. Class sizes are small to give students the attention and support they need.

#9 American Public University

Executive Summary
APU has developed a reputation for providing students with cutting-edge educational programs at affordable prices. All undergraduate students are provided with textbooks, journals and ebooks at no extra charge.
Tuition
Students enrolled in the Nursing program at APU pay $250 per credit hour.
Unique Features
The Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree program is geared toward students who hold an Associate degree and are licensed Registered Nurses. It focuses on courses which help to develop the nurse’s role as a practitioner, a leader and as a scientist.

#10 Anna Maria College

Executive Summary
Anna Maria College is a private, non-profit Catholic school. It is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.
Tuition
This program costs $394 per credit hour.
Unique Features
This school’s RN to BSN program is taught by nurse educators who have real-world experience. Applicants receive recognition for their professional expertise and there is no clinical component required for this degree.
For more resources like this list of Top 10 Online Undergraduate Nursing Programs, see Top 10 Online Colleges for Health Care.

NWACC Investigates Claims of Bullying in the Nursing Department

ROGERS, AR -- The president of Northwest Arkansas Community College (NWACC) said she's looking into claims that students are being bullied and forced out by the college's nursing department.

In a statement, Dr. Evelyn E. Jorgenson, NWACC President said, “As president of NWACC, it is my responsibility to support the mission of the College and to help our students maximize their potential and exceed expectations. We are taking the allegations from these anonymous students very seriously."

She addressed some of the claims recently made by an anonymous group of former and current students noting the NWACC Nursing program is approved by the Arkansas State Board of Nursing.

The group of students reported the school's claim of a program pass rate of  97-percent was fabricated but Jorgenson said the number is accurate and comes from the National Council for Licensure Examination's 2013 statistics.

Jorgenson also remarked NWACC does have a process for resolving complaints and grievances toward faculty and staff members, including being able to file one anonymously and noted that there has been no grade appeal or grievance during the 2013-2014 academic year.

Earlier this month, an anonymous e-mail arrived in Jorgenson's inbox, saying certain instructors were sabotaging students efforts to learn.


KNWA News: http://www.nwahomepage.com/fulltext-news/nwacc-investigates-claims-of-bullying-in-the-nursi/d/fulltext-news/s9os_mp2BEOE0s7orYcArw

KNWA News: http://www.nwahomepage.com/story/students-accuse-nwacc-instructors-of-academic-bull/d/story/JEp0l7FRjEWS1jrH3hZ6BA